CoastParadise:You are now in: CoastParadise -> North Carolina -> Northern Coast

FAST LINKS TO CATEGORIES:  

FAST LINKS TO PAGES:  


invisible Lifestyle:

   Beach Front
   Beach View
   Beach Walking Distance
   Board Walks
   Country Clubs
   Diving
   Entertainment
   Fishing
   Golf Courses
   Harbours & Marinas
   Night Clubs
   Restaurants
   Roller Blading
   Shopping
   Surfing
   Yacht Clubs

Medium Price:

   up to $150,000
   $150,001 - $200,000
   $200,001 - $300,000
   $300,001 - $400,000
   $400,001 - $500,000
   $500,001 - $600,000
   $600,001 - $700,000
   $700,001 - $800,000
   $800,001 and more

Summer Temperature - Air:

   bellow 60°F
   61°F - 70°F
   71°F - 80°F
   81°F - 90°F
   90°F +

Winter Temperature - Air:

   below 60°F
   61°F - 70°F
   81°F - 90°F
   90°F +

Summer Temperature - Water:

   bellow 60°F
   61°F - 70°F
   71°F - 80°F
   81°F - 90°F

Winter Temperature - Water:

   bellow 60°F
   61°F - 70°F
   71°F - 80°F
-->
invisible

Summer Temperature - Water:  71°F - 80°F
Winter Temperature - Water:  bellow 60°F



sign up for updates about this project or community

 Northern Coast

Do you dream of warm, mild temperatures, crystal-clear waters, and pristine beaches?  Does the idea of battling billfish, climbing to the top of a lighthouse, hang gliding above the dunes, or touring small islands via sea kayak sound exciting? Then, the northern coast of North Carolina is the place to be. 

Warmed by the Gulf Stream, the North Carolina Coast sports sun-drenched beaches, giant sand dunes, and wetlands galore. Toss in a 130 mile chain of fragile, unspoiled barrier islands called the Outer Banks and you may come to call this place paradise.

The region, like all of North Carolina is jam-packed with history, dating back to the 16th century, when the first English settlement was built - and then vanished. There are historic sites dating back to the pre-Revolutionary Days and extending through to the Civil War to explore.  And, let us not forget the contribution of the Wright Brothers who opened the doors of aviation with their memorable flight at Kitty Hawk.

For those searching for a great place to live, the northern coast of North Carolina can offer you diversity. From beach houses to historic homes and a little of everything in between, the north coast has something to fit everyone’s budget and needs.  And, if you are just visiting, kick your shoes off, wiggle your toes on the sandy white beaches, and just relax.

photo

COUNTIES & CITIES

Counties: The Northern Coast area consists of the following counties:  Bertie, Camden, Chowan, Currituck, Date, Gates, Hertford, Hyde, Perquimany, Pasquotank, Tyrell, and Washington. 

Bertie County

The Census of 2000 showed that there were 19,773 people residing in the county. The racial makeup of the county was 36.30% White, 62.34% Black or African American, 0.44% Native American, 0.11% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.33% from other races, and 0.48% from two or more races. 0.99% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.  The median income for a household in the county was $25,177, and the median income for a family was $30,186.  The per capita income for the county was $14,096.

Bertie is one of the largest counties in North Carolina, spanning 741 square miles.  It is comprised of several small towns and cities with populations ranging from 180 to the largest of 2,300.  These include Askewville, Aulander, Colerain, Kelford, Lewiston Woodville, Powellsville, Roxobel, Windsor, and Merry Hill.

The small town of Lewiston Woodville, population 631, is home to Perdue Farms Inc.  Perdue is one of the largest chicken-producing companies in North Carolina.  Windsor, the county seat of Bertie County, is located between the Roanoke and Chowan Rivers, headwaters of the Albemarle Sound.  It is centrally located on major highways and just a short drive from the Outer Banks. Founded in 1768, the town remains today much as it did in its heyday.

Camden County

As of the 2000 census, there were 6,885 people residing in the county. The racial makeup of the county was 80.62% White, 17.27% Black or African American, 0.42% Native American, 0.57% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.13% from other races, and 0.96% from two or more races. 0.71% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.  The median income for a household in the county was $39,493, and the median income for a family was $45,387. The per capita income for the county was $18,681.

The county is divided into three townships known as Courthouse, Shiloh, and South Mills.  South Mills sits near the Dismal Swamp Canal which is the oldest continually operating man-made canal in the United States, opened in 1805.  The area is surrounded by the Great Dismal Swamp.

Chowan County

The census of 2000 indicated that there were 14,526 people residing in Chowan County. The racial makeup of the county was 60.54% White, 37.52% Black or African American, 0.30% Native American, 0.34% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.60% from other races, and 0.70% from two or more races. 1.51% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.  The median income for a household in the county was $30,928, and the median income for a family was $36,986.  The per capita income for the county was $15,027.

The county seat is Edenton which has approximately 5400 residents.  Edentown holds the distinction of being the location of the first permanent settlement in North Carolina. Established in 1728 as the colonial capital of North Carolina, Edenton quickly became a cultural and economic capital as well.  Visitors can tour Edenton’s historical colonial homes and buildings which have been restored to their original splendor.  Over 25 homes and public buildings are registered as North Carolina State Historic Sites.

Currituck County

There were 18,190 people residing in the county as of the 2000 census. The racial makeup of the county was 90.41% White, 7.25% Black or African American, 0.46% Native American, 0.39% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.50% from other races, and 0.97% from two or more races. 1.43% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.  The median income for a household in the county was $40,822, and the median income for a family was $46,382.  The per capita income for the county was $19,908.

Currituck County is one of the fastest growing counties in North Carolina. County officials describe the county as “a blend of a past that is rich in heritage with a vision for a progressive tomorrow.” Towns and noted areas of interest within Currituck County include Currituck, Sligo, Moyock, Shawboro, Gregory, Knotts Island, Maple, Barco, Waterlily, Corolla, Sanderling, Poplar Beach, Coinjock, Grandy, Jarvisburg, Powells Point, Mamie, Spot, Harbinger, and Point Harbor.

Like most of the counties on the northern coast of North Carolina, Currituck’s main industry centers on tourism.  USA Today named Corolla as one of the top ten beaches in the U.S. and described Currituck beaches as some of the “best undiscovered beaches on the East Coast.”

Dare County

As of the 2000 census, there were 29,967 people residing in Dare County. The racial makeup of the county was 94.75% White, 2.66% Black or African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.37% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.90% from other races, and 1.00% from two or more races. 2.22% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Incorporate cities and towns include Kill Devil Hills, Kitty Hawk, Manteo, Nags Head, Southern Shores, Wanchese, and Duck.  Unincorporated communities include Manns Harbor, Hatteras, Buxton, and Avon, Rodanthe, Salvo, and Waves.

A strong pirate holdout, Kill Devil Hills is the home of the Wright Brothers National Memorial, commemorating Orville Wright's historic first flight.  Nags Head boasts the largest sand dune on the East Coast called Jockey's Ridge. Over the years, the sand dune has migrated from wind and erosion.  It has even buried a miniature golf course along the way.

The Cape Hatteras Lighthouse and the Bodie Island Lighthouse are also located in Dare County.  The Cape Hatteras Lighthouse is located on Hatteras Island in the Outer Banks near the town of Buxton.  The Bodie Island Lighthouse is located just north of the Oregon Inlet, but is not open to the public as it still functions as a U.S. Coast Guard navigational aid.

Gates County

There were 10,516 people residing in this county as of the 2000 census.  The racial makeup of the county was 59.08% White, 39.18% Black or African American, 0.42% Native American, 0.25% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.10% from other races, and 0.94% from two or more races. 0.77% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

The county is divided into the following cities and towns: Gatesville, Hall, Haslett, Holly Grove, Hunters Mill, Mintonville, and Reynoldson.  In total, the county is only 346 square miles in size.

Gatesville is home to the Merchants Millpond State Park.  The park provides opportunities for camping and canoeing through this 750-acre cypress millpond and wilderness sanctuary for wetland wildlife.  Places to visit on the National Historic Register include Buckland, Elmwood Plantation, the Freeman House (near Gates), the Joseph Freeman House (near Reynoldson), and the Gates County Courthouse.

Hertford County

As of the census of 2000, there were 22,601 people residing in Hertford County.  The racial makeup of the county was 37.45% White, 59.55% Black or African American, 1.19% Native American, 0.31% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.65% from other races, and 0.82% from two or more races. 1.57% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.  The median income for a household in the county was $26,422, and the median income for a family was $32,002. The per capita income for the county was $15,641.

Ahoskie, Harrellsville, Maneys Neck, Murfreesboro, St. Johns, and Winton are the primary towns and cities located within the county.  Several large employers including a federal prison, Chowan College (Murfreesboro), a Nucor steel mill, several Perdue facilities, an aluminum extrusion facility in Winton, and a lumber processing facility in Ahoskie provide residents with jobs.

Hyde County

In 2000, there were 5,826 people residing in Hyde County. The racial makeup of the county was 62.65% White, 35.07% Black or African American, 0.31% Native American, 0.36% Asian, 0.84% from other races, and 0.77% from two or more races. 2.25% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race. The median income for a household in the county was $28,444, and the median income for a family was $35,558. The per capita income for the county was $13,164.

Hyde is one of North Carolina's largest counties in terms of by acreage but has fewer than 5500 residents. The county is comprised of Currituck, Fairfield, Lake Landing, Ocracoke Island, and Swan Quarter. The “unorganized territory” of Mattamuskeet which includes the Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge is also part of Hyde County.

Ocracoke Island is the last inhabited island, from north to south, of the Outer Banks.  It can only be reached by one of public ferry, private boat, or private plane.  Tourism and fishing, both commercial and chartered sport fishing, are the largest industries. Ocracoke Island was also a favorite haven for the pirate Blackbeard.

Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge encompasses four national wildlife refuges covering over 115,000 acres.  It is a haven for nature study, bird-watching, hunting, fishing and camping.  If you are a hunter, then the Gull Rock Gameland near Swan Quarter offers you the chance to hunt/catch ox, dove, quail, rabbit, squirrel, raccoon, deer, waterfowl and warm water fish, when in seasons with the appropriate license.  

Pasquotank County

The census of 2000 indicated that there were 34,897 people residing in the county. The racial makeup of the county was 56.93% White, 40.05% Black or African American, 0.37% Native American, 0.86% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.49% from other races, and 1.26% from two or more races. 1.23% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race. The median income for a household in the county was $30,444, and the median income for a family was $36,402. The per capita income for the county was $14,815.

Elizabeth City and Weeksville are both located is Pasquotank County.  Elizabeth City is home to approximately 17,000 people and is located on the banks of the Pasquotank River and is nicknamed the “Harbor of Hospitality”.  It is also home to the largest US Coast Guard Air Base.

Perquimans County

In 2000, there were 11,368 people living in Perquimans County. The racial makeup of the county was 70.82% White, 27.99% Black or African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.21% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.13% from other races, and 0.64% from two or more races. 0.60% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.  The median income for a household in the county was $29,538, and the median income for a family was $35,212. The per capita income for the county was $15,728.

Hertford and Winfall are both located in Perquimans County.  Over seventy-five percent of Hertford’s buildings contribute to its historic district designation and provide visitors with a wonderful walking tour. Winfall serves primarily as a residential area with growing commercial facilities.

Tyrrell County

The census of 2000 indicated that there were 4,149 people residing in the county. The racial makeup of the county was 56.47% White, 39.43% African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.75% Asian, 0.00% Pacific Islander, 2.05% from other races, and 1.11% from two or more races. 3.62% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.  The median income for a household in the county was $25,684, and the median income for a family was $32,468. The per capita income for the county was $13,326.

Columbia, Alligator, Columbia, Gum Neck, Scuppernong, and South Fork are all located in Tyrrell County.  Columbia, a small charming, Victorian town, is located only half hours drive from the Outer Banks.  Due to this proximity to the Outer Banks, land and property value have increased dramatically since 2000.

Washington County

The census of 2000 indicated there were 13,723 people residing in Washington County. The racial makeup of the county was 48.28% White, 48.94% Black or African American, 0.05% Native American, 0.32% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 1.66% from other races, and 0.70% from two or more races. 2.27% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.  The median income for a household in the county was $28,865, and the median income for a family was $34,888. The per capita income for the county was $14,994.

Creswell, Plymouth, Roper, Lees Mill, Plymouth, Scuppernong, and Skinnersville are located in this county.  Creswell boasts some of North Carolina's best remaining examples of downtown architecture from the late 1800's.  Also of notable historic interest are Somerset Place, Pettigrew State Park, Phelps Lake, and the Albemarle Sound.  Plymouth, located on the banks of the Roanoke River, has a rich maritime history to explore.  Visitors can explore displays of boats and maritime life; take hands–on classes in wooden boat building, or a leisurely historic walking tour of the town.

 



sign up for updates about this project or community


Search similar Lifestyle :

Search similar Medium Price :

Search similar Summer Temperature - Air:

Search similar Winter Temperature - Air:

Search similar Summer Temperature - Water:
   Browse in North Carolina for    71°F - 80°F    

Search similar Winter Temperature - Water:
   Browse in North Carolina for    bellow 60°F    





Write your opinion about Alabama



Alabama  |  California  |  Florida  |  Georgia  |  Hawaii  |  Louisiana  |  Maryland  |  Mississippi  |  North Carolina  |  Oregon  |  South Carolina  |  Texas  |  Virginia  |  Washington  |  


© 2003-2005 EastBiz.com, Inc. All rights Reserved , Phone: 702-212-3513, info@millionsaver.com,
Add your link for free!Terms - Privacy Policy - REALTOR marketing & leads - Real Estate Franchise
 - Site Map